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    dr seuss

  • Theodor Seuss Geisel (March 2, 1904 – September 24, 1991) was an American writer and cartoonist most widely known for his children’s books written under the pen names Dr. Seuss, Theo. LeSieg and, in one case, Rosetta Stone.
  • uses a lot of onomatopoeia. In “Mr Brown can moo! Can you?”, for example.
  • Did the chicken cross the road? Did he cross it with a toad? Yes, the chicken crossed the road, but why it crossed I’ve not been told.

    clip art

  • Predrawn pictures and symbols that computer users can add to their documents, often provided with word-processing software and drawing packages
  • copyright free photos or drawings.
  • Clip art, in the graphic arts, refers to pre-made images used to illustrate any medium. Today, clip art is used extensively in both personal and commercial projects, ranging from home-printed greeting cards to commercial candles. Clip art comes in many forms, both electronic and printed.
  • ready-made pieces of computerized graphic art that can be used to decorate a document

dr seuss clip art

dr seuss clip art – The Butter

The Butter Battle Book: (New York Times Notable Book of the Year) (Classic Seuss)
The Butter Battle Book: (New York Times Notable Book of the Year) (Classic Seuss)
“Dr. Seuss chronicles the feud between the Yooks and the Zooks from slingshots through sophisticated weaponry, until each side has the capacity to destroy the world. The language amuses, the drawings are zesty and humorous, and the demand for this book will be large.”–School Library Journal.

“Provocative, packs an allegorical punch. The parade of increasingly elaborate (and ridiculous) armaments makes a telling point.”–Booklist.

A cautionary Cold War tale (first told by Dr. Seuss back in 1984), The Butter Battle Book still has a lot to teach about intolerance and how tit-for-tat violence can quickly get out of hand. Explaining the very serious differences between the Zooks and the Yooks, a Zook grandpa tells his grandchild the unspeakable truth: “It’s high time that you knew of the terribly horrible thing that Zooks do. In every Zook house and every Zook town every Zook eats his bread with the butter side down!” He then recalls his days with the Zook-Watching Border Patrol, as he gave any Zook who dared come close “a twitch with my tough-tufted prickley Snick-Berry Switch.” But when the Zooks fought back, the switches gave way to Triple-Sling Jiggers, then Jigger-Rock Snatchems–even a Kick-a-Poo Kid that was “loaded with powerful Poo-a-Doo Powder and ants’ eggs and bees’ legs and dried-fried clam chowder.”
With lots of fun and more-than-fair digs at the runaway spending and one-upmanship of U.S.-Soviet days, The Butter Battle Book makes a chuckle-filled read whether you’re old enough to get the historical references or not. (And with all the Bitsy Big-Boy Boomeroos still in service, this book’s message is far from obsolete.) (Ages 4 to 8) –Paul Hughes

Abundance

Abundance
One evening, I caught a glimpse of a news clip showing an exhibit of Theodore Geisel’s unseen artwork, including paintings of many odd little characters that are more commonly seen as line-drawings in his (Dr. Seuss’s) books. They were so inspiring, that after years of not holding a paintbrush in my hand, I took a canvas out and went to town! This one is a first in a small series that were inspired by Dr. Seuss. This one, I believe, has a bit of Tim Burton in it, too. Considering once again that I had absolutely no idea what to paint when the blank canvas first stared at me, I just had fun and came up with this. It took me years to learn not to have expectations. Much more enjoyable that way. I’m posting this one here, to inspire all of you to do something outside the box, just for the fun of it.

PS- play safe! :-)

Dr. Seuss inspired Digital Clip Art

Dr. Seuss inspired Digital Clip Art
Dr. Seuss inspired digital clip art frames, great for digital scrapbooking, party decoration labels and tags, invitation clip art for birthday party invitations and other paper crafts.

dr seuss clip art

If I Ran the Zoo (Classic Seuss)
“Young Gerald McGrew thinks of all sorts of unusual animals he’d have in a zoo. Dr. Seuss at his best.”–Horn Book.

“It’s a pretty good zoo,” said young Gerald McGrew, “and the fellow who runs it seems proud of it, too.” But if Gerald ran the zoo, the New Zoo, McGrew Zoo, he’d see to making a change or two: “So I’d open each cage. I’d unlock every pen, let the animals go, and start over again.” And that’s just what Gerald imagines, as he travels the world in this playfully illustrated Dr. Seuss classic (first published back in 1950), collecting all sorts of beasts “that you don’t see every day.” From the mountains of Zomba-ma-Tant to the blistering sands of the Desert of Zind, Gerald hunts down every animal imaginable (“I’ll catch ‘em in countries no one can spell, like the country of Motta-fa-Potta-fa-Pell”). Whether it’s a scraggle-foot Mulligatawny or a wild-haired Iota (from “the far western part of south-east North Dakota”), Gerald amazes the world with his new and improved zoo: “This Zoo Keeper, New Keeper’s simply astounding! He travels so far that you think he would drop! When do you suppose this young fellow will stop?”
But Gerald’s weird and wonderful globe-trotting safari doesn’t end a moment too soon: “young McGrew’s made his mark. He’s built a zoo better than Noah’s whole Ark!” Some of the text and illustrations–imaginative as they are–are obviously dated, such as the following passage: “I’ll hunt in the mountains of Zomba-ma-Tant/ With helpers who all wear their eyes at a slant,/ And capture a fine fluffy bird called the Bustard/ Who only eats custard with sauce made of mustard.” And your children may be the first to recognize that attitudes have changed since the xenophobic ’50s. But that doesn’t mean this tale need be discarded; instead, it should be discussed. Ironically, Seuss was trying here–in his wild, explosive, and sometimes careless manner–to celebrate the joys of unconventionality and the bliss of liberation! (Ages 4 to 8)

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